Ride Sharing Is Already Reducing Car Ownership and Public Transportation Usage

ride sharing

A recent study by the ride-hailing service Lyft and a similar study by a group of American universities pointed to the positive impact ride-sharing services not only have on consumers, but on the surrounding communities they service. These studies found that ride-hailing services aid in reducing congestion, increase individual consumer mobility, and found that in 2017 alone, Lyft passengers spent over $2 billion more in communities where ride-sharing services exist. But, the studies and more also point to the negative impact ride sharing services have on individual car ownership and public transportation usage in the same areas.

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Foley’s 2017 Connected Cars & Autonomous Vehicles Survey - Part 2

connected cars

This is part two of the review of our survey released in October 2017. The survey feedback suggests that many automotive and technology companies are already forging ahead despite the challenges. Click here for the first part of our review.

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Foley’s 2017 Connected Cars & Autonomous Vehicles Survey - Part 1

We’re in the midst of a rapid evolution not only in the way drivers operate their vehicles, but also in the operations, compliance, go-to-market strategy and cyber preparedness of the entire automotive industry. More than 70 million connected cars will be on the road by 2023, as predicted by IHS Markit, and autonomous vehicles aren’t far behind with current models equipped with semi-autonomous functionality, including auto-steering, self-parking, autonomous lane changing and collision-avoidance features.

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Autonomous Vehicles and Ride Sharing Will Reshape Our Buildings, Our Cities, and Our Lives

parking in cities

When the first automobile hit roadways in the early 1900s, developers, planners, and city officials had to completely re-think the design and planning of cityscapes, both new and old. The era of narrow streets, communities defined by walking distance or streetcar line, and short-distance commuting gave way to massive boulevards, interstate highways, and the rise of suburbanization. These shifts in urban planning had the sole objective of utilizing the car to move as many people as quickly and safely as possible, without the limitations of public transit. But, because of this, cities themselves suffered, resulting in obsolete buildings being demolished, neighborhoods destroyed for highways, public transit being reduced or removed, and intimate communities ripped apart to shoehorn in 7-lane boulevards. Now, as autonomous cars, busses, and other next-generation technologies entering the mass-market, developers and city officials are again having to re-think how disruptive technologies will shape the way we live, work, and play in our cities.

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